Brighton & Hove

Brighton was a sleepy little fishing village, then known as Brighthelmstone, until Dr Richard Russell of Lewes began to prescribe the use of seawater for his patients. He advocated the drinking of seawater and sea-bathing in 1750. In 1753 he erected a large house near the beach for himself and for his patients. A further factor in Brighton’s growth came in the early 19th century when the Prince of Wales built the Royal Pavilion, an extravagant Regency building designed by John Nash. But it was only with the development of the railways, around 1840, that Brighton truly started to boom.

The city is close to London, and is increasingly popular with media and music types who don’t want to live in the capital. It is sometimes called “London-by-the-Sea” for this reason. Brighton is typically referred to as the gay capital of Britain. There is a significant gay district in Kemp Town which adds to the Bohemian atmosphere of the city.

Whilst a day trip to Brighton, or even a long weekend, will offer activities and culture for the visitor all year round, it is in the springtime that the city really starts coming to life, and May sees the return of two of the most popular festivals, Brighton Festival and Festival Fringe (see the events section). In the summer Brighton truly flourishes, with residents and visitors enjoying lazy days and beautiful sunsets on what is perhaps the city’s greatest asset, the more than 5-mile stretch of shingle beach, facing south onto the English Channel.

How to get to Brighton & Hove

Food & Drink in Brighton and Hove

Activities in Brighton and Hove

Shopping in Brighton and Hove

Accommodation in Brighton and Hove

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